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pattern // a noble marquise peridot for august

August Peridot Pattern

Ready to stitch another birthstone? This month we're stitching a marquise-cut peridot, and as with all the other Wild Olive Birthstone Stitching Club patterns, it's free!

Occasionally my life feels overwhelming. Does that happen to you too? The result of that overwhelm is that I work on all the things I've promised to other people and I let my own projects sit on a back burner. Sometimes I pull them off the stove entirely. And while that's sometimes the right thing to do, it creates its own problems.

To remedy this, I'm trying to work on Wild Olive projects one day a week before I work on all the rest. My commitment to all the rest means it will still get done, but hopefully, I'll make progress on my own work...which means more things to share with you too!

All of this to say, I actually stitched this month's pattern AND sewed the EPP pieces together! It feels like a huge accomplishment, even though it only took a few hours all together.


Whether you've been stitching along all year so far, or if this is your first time encountering these patterns, I hope you enjoy this one. AND I hope you share your pics with the world! Tag them #WildOliveStitchingClub so we can see.

calendar // a noble peridot for august



Hello, August! I've got a pretty new peridot birthstone calendar wallpaper for you!

July felt like the shortest and longest month. Shortest because I think it flew by. But longest because I squeezed in so much during the month. And now we're here in August and I'm just not sure how it happened.

Regardless, I'm charging full speed ahead. August is my sister's birthday month, and I'm pretty sure she wasn't a fan of her birthstone growing up. Now she has a better appreciation for this bright and bold green. As do I!

The cut this month is a marquise cut, and so I'm calling this a noble peridot. Grab the calendars for your computer, tablet, and phone!


I'm kinda loving the look of this gem, and I might need to hurry and make a bonus project with this one. Perhaps as a gift for my sister?

Oh, and happy birthday to all the August babies!

project // sew a softie wobbly piggy toy

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball


Sew a Softie is a fun campaign to encourage kids (and others!) to try sewing simple soft toys. My contribution is this squishy piggy that's also a wobbly ball! It might look a little more advanced, but I promise you this isn't difficult.

This project is perfect for kids who have a little sewing machine experience, or for those who are new to sewing and have some help from a grown-up.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

I made this little piggy with a sewing machine, which speeds up the process, but you can sew it by hand if you want. If you're sewing by hand, use small backstitches to stitch the seams. The small stitches will prevent any of the weighted filler in the bottom from escaping.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

You will need:

Pink Anti-Pill Fleece - 1/4 yard
Black Felt - scrap
Pink and Black Embroidery Floss
Weighted Pellets or Beans
Stuffing
Basic Sewing Supplies

THIS LITTLE PIGGY SOFTIE PATTERN

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Cut out 7 body pieces. Fleece stretches more in one direction than the other. Make sure to cut the pieces so the arrow on the pattern matches with the stretch of the fleece.

Cut out the 2 ears and nose from fleece. Then cut two eyes from black felt.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Embroider the tail on one of the body pieces. The pattern includes a tail pattern, but it's pretty easy to freehand this. Just have it start at one edge, which will be the center of the piggy's back.

Attach the nose to another body piece. Use 3 strands of pink embroidery floss and back stitch to attach it. Then, stitch the nostrils.

Attach the eyes with 3 strands of black embroidery floss and whip stitch around the edges. Then, stitch the mouth.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Pin the ears to the face with the straight edges on the sides and the points facing in.

It's often hard to tell, but anti-pill fleece has a right and a wrong side. Try to make sure the ears are placed with the right side down.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Pin and sew a body piece to each side of the face panel. Use a 1/4-inch seam allowance and be sure to catch the ears as you sew.

Again, try to make sure you pin the right sides of the fabric together.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Keep adding plain body pieces on, first adding to the left, then adding to the right. When you have two pieces left, add the piece with the tail so that the edge with the tail ends up in the center of the back. Add the last piece.

Then, sew the two open edges together a little at the top and the bottom, leaving an opening near the middle.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball
This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Before you turn the ball shape right side out, check to make sure the top and bottom are sewn closed without a hole. If you have a little gap like this, hold the ball flat and sew across the opening.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Turn the piggy right side out and add weighted pellets to the bottom. Use enough to give it some good weight. I added almost 1 cup.

NOTE: If you want to give this piggy to a small child, skip this step, as the pellets or beans could cause choking if they get out.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Next, fill the piggy with stuffing. Add it in small pieces, which helps it look even. Keep adding stuffing until it's full.

Because fleece stretches, it will probably take more stuffing than you expect it to.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Stitch the opening on the back closed.

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

This little wobbly piggy is ready to play!

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

I just love the little tail!

This Little Piggy Wobbly Softie Ball

Give your piggy some hugs, then try rolling him on the floor. Because of the weight in the bottom, he'll always land right side up!

vintage craft // weave-it and crazy daisy tools

Vintage Crazy Daisy Winder

Vintage craft tools and supplies always excite me, whether they are completely different from what we use now, exactly the same, or something in between. And I recently played with two such tools that aren't all that different from more recent creations, but they were still the first time I'd used anything like them. They are the Crazy Daisy Winder and the Weave-It pin loom.

I have no idea how long I've had this Crazy Daisy Winder. Undoubtedly it belonged to one of my relatives, but this was the first time I remember paying any attention to it. Thankfully, the well-preserved box still held the instructions along with the incredibly well-made brass winding tool.

Vintage Crazy Daisy Winder
Vintage Crazy Daisy Winder

It's pretty simple to wind one of these, and I love that they show you how to join them to actually use them for something. In fact, if you search for Crazy Daisy Winder on Ravelry, you'll still find a few patterns! They're sometimes used for shawls and tablecloths.

But now, let's take a look at how this went for me!

Vintage Crazy Daisy Winder

I used some extra Lemonade Shop sock yarn for my test. The wrapping process is very easy, although the weaving part gave me pause. Mainly because I wasn't sure if I had secured it enough. I probably overdid it, although it's also possible to add even more rounds in the center to create a different look.

Vintage Crazy Daisy Winder

After the center is secure, you turn the little handle, which retracts the pins and releases the daisy. I find this part to be highly satisfying.

Vintage Crazy Daisy Winder

And that's a finished daisy! I wouldn't call it a huge success, but it is a flower!

This is a single daisy, and I have a feeling I'd like the look of a double one better. Using thicker yarn would also change the look.

Vintage Weave-It Tool

After my Crazy Daisy Winder experience, I jumped right into trying one of the Weave-It tools I inherited from my grandma.

Vintage Weave-It Tool

I've been fascinated with these since I was a child because I remember a drawer filled with this vintage WIP at my grandma's house. And the Weave-It pin loom was in there with it too. And of course, all the yarn needed to continue the project. Apparently these were actually extras or possibly a second Afghan because my mom tells me that another completed one exists somewhere.

Vintage Weave-It Tool

While I don't recall ever using one of these tools before, when I opened the Weave-It box, I found this little loopy square. It looks suspiciously like something a young Mollie would have made.

Vintage Weave-It Tool

Once again, I used sock yarn, which, as you can see when it's on the loom, is a little thin for this. Still, you can see the weaving for this purpose.

The Weave-It pin loom, by the way, is very similar to the Zoom Loom. And like the new version suggests, it is fast! All you have to do is wind the yarn back and forth between the pins, and repeat that two times, rotating the loom each time. Finally, you weave the yarn through the layers to secure the weaving.

That's the simple version, but you can find tons of patterns to make different versions with multiple colors and textures.

Vintage Weave-It Tool

After the end is secured, you slide the square up to the top of the pins...

Vintage Weave-It Tool

...and you have a woven square! You can see how much it relaxes and the warp and weft comes together. It's still much more open than it should be, but hey...this was a test.

Vintage Weave-It Tool

My favorite thing from my first (or possibly my second?) square is that you can spot a little heart in the corner. Maybe because I think I love these squares and can't wait to make more and learn how to join them next!

You can hear me talk about these fun tools and more in episode 8 of the Very Serious Crafts Podcast. You'll find some pin loom links in the show notes too!

pattern // a round and rosy ruby (plus gemstone inspiration!)



If you've been following along and collecting all of the free birthstone embroidery patterns this year, you may have been worried that I forgot this one. Fear not! I have a rosy ruby pattern for you...and some fun gemstone "research" too!

Blog posts around here certainly have been spotty lately, although I have a few things up my sleeve for the coming weeks. But for July I at least have a good excuse. For two wonderful weeks, I was in England, visiting my friend Katie and seeing all kinds of fantastic things. Traveling always inspires me, and I'm happy to report that I have plans for a new embroidery pattern set.

But before I even start on that, I wanted to show you some birthstone and gemstone inspiration I found at the London Natural History Museum.

Gemstone Inspiration
Gemstone Inspiration

Okay, so my phone photography of gems on a dark background through a glass case may not be inspired. But seeing so many cuts and colors definitely was helpful to me.

But I also saw something that was so interesting and answered a question that I hadn't yet Googled: How do they cut and shape gemstones? In fact, before I got to the museum I had been considering making a pattern that showed each step in the process. That idea probably won't happen, but thanks to a helpful display, I now know how it works!

Since this is a bit of a DIY blog, allow me to show you how to cut a faceted gemstone!

How Gemstone are Cut

Start with a rough crystal and cut it into two pieces.

How Gemstone are Cut

Round the stone against a diamond and polish the first facets.

How Gemstone are Cut
How Gemstone are Cut

Keep adding and polishing facets.

How Gemstone are Cut

Your gemstone is finished!

Now you know how to cut your own beautiful gems and diamonds. Isn't that easy? Hahaha! Okay, so I guess most of us won't be doing anything like this any time soon. But as a "Very Serious Crafter", this sort of thing excites me nonetheless.

The only thing better than seeing step by step gemstone cutting (sort of!) was...

Gemstone Inspiration

A rainbow of gems!

Okay, now let's get back to what you came here for: the July Ruby Birthstone embroidery pattern!


I haven't stitched it, chosen colors or fabric, or even printed out my pattern yet. But YOU CAN! Share your pics and tag them #WildOliveStitchingClub. And if you're just finding this now, be sure to look through all the past patterns in the series for more info on how these pieces all come together.

And as soon as I get caught up on other work (is that a thing? getting truly caught up?), I'll be stitching my little gemstone heart out!

new wild olive + the pink samurai happy house enamel pin

Happy House Enamel Pin

It is with great honor and excitement that I announce the very first Wild Olive enamel pin! I collaborated with Becky from The Pink Samurai to make this happy house as part of her The Pink Samurai & Friends collection. And I couldn't be happier with how it turned out!

For a while now, I've thought about making a pin (or pins!), but it wasn't feasible for me to do on my own. Then Becky and I met up for breakfast when I was visiting Austin, TX, and we got to talking about collaborations. Before long, I was working up a few ideas, and we settled on this happy house.

Happy House Enamel Pin

But it's not just a house, it's really a happy home. Because as much as I like to travel (it's what let Becky and I meet up!), I'm a homebody. I work from home, I like eating at home, and I enjoy evenings at home. Yes, I do leave the house, but home is nice, ya know?

Happy House Enamel Pin
Happy House Enamel Pin
Happy House Enamel Pin

This is the July pin for The Pink Samurai & Friends series, and if you subscribe for future months (July isn't included now), you'll get lots more cute pins. Like, seriously cute! Even the packaging is adorable. And other than the coral glitter door, my favorite part about this pin is the logo imprint on the back. It's so fancy!

Happy House Enamel Pin

The Happy Home pin is only available through The Pink Samurai, and it's a limited edition, so don't wait! If you don't mind if your pin isn't 100% perfect, you can also check to see if there are still houses left in the seconds sale.

Thanks, Becky, for the fun collaboration! And thanks to my Wild Olive friends for any pins you might decide to order!

calendar // a rosy ruby for july



Ready for another gemstone? July's birthstone is a ruby, and I chose a rose-cut style. I love that in a rosy ruby color it's a little like a round flower and a little like a shimmering firework. And with that rosy face, who could resist such a pretty gem?

It's a busy time over here again, so another short and sweet post. With more good things to come soon...I hope! But hey! At least July is here a little early!

Now, how about those calendars?


pattern // a pearl birthstone for june

June Pearl Pattern

Pearl is June's birthstone, which is a bit of a challenge when it comes to making an embroidery pattern. Well, actually it's not much of a challenge at all, being just a circle, but therein lies the challenge. How do you make a circle with a face look interesting and still like a pearl?

Well, you choose a pretty pearly color (in this case DMC 677), and you add a few lines to make it look like it has some shine. And then you just go with it. There have been and will be plenty of more detailed birthstones in this year-long collection.


In this PDF you'll find the mini version to go on a hexagon, the large version if you're so inclined, and the hexagon and half hexagons to make the EPP portion of this be project that I'm dreadfully behind on. I've stitched all my embroideries, but I have a few months worth of EPP to catch up on.

I know some of you are actually ahead of me, and it's so fun to see the photos on Instagram! Even if you're just joining this free version of the Wild Olive Stitching Club, or even if you just want to make a single birthstone, we'd love to see your pictures too! Just share and tag them #wildolivestitchingclub.

And then click the tags below to find previous posts in this series. Happy June Stitching!

printable // kawaii tie father's day card

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card


Dad might not need one more tie for Father's Day, but this card gives a nod to ties (cute ones at that!) while letting you or your child create a little piece of art. Just print out the pieces and then decorate the tie with a fun and easy art technique.

It's become a tradtition that I give my dad a cute Father's Day card in my Wild Olive style. He loves it...or at least he acts like he does because he's my dad! Last year I gave him this french fry box card, and he still has it! But I mean, who wouldn't want a cute card with a face?

The printable PDF has two ties, so you can easily make a few cards or have a back-up in case one tie gets messed up.

Ready to design a tie for dad? Let's get started!

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card

You will need:

White Cardstock
Colored Paper or Cardstock
Scissors
Markers
Spray Bottle
Glue Stick

DOWNLOAD THE FATHER'S DAY TIE CARD PDF

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card

Print the tie page on white cardstock and the "Happy Father's Day" page on colored paper.

Cut out a kawaii tie (or two!) and decorate it with markers. If you're making this with a child, obviously they would do this!

Instead of using markers, crayon resist is another fun process to decorate the tie.

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card

Fill the spray bottle with water and set it to mist. Spray the tie a few times so the marker ink starts to bleed. I misted mine about three times.

Let the water dry on its own (it doesn't take too long) or blot it with a paper towel. The cardstock will be damp, so let it dry out.

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card

While the tie is drying, fold the card page in half. Add a message and sign the inside.

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card
Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card

Attach the finished tie to the front of the card.

Father's Day Printable Kawaii Tie Card

Now you can give the card to your dad, a dad you know, or the dad-like person in your life. You know he's gonna love it and wish that he had a real tie just like this!