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project // disney snacks mickey pretzel felt ornament

Mickey Pretzel Felt Ornament

I'm not sure why, but soft pretzels shaped like Mickey Mouse just taste better. And if I'm turning iconic Disney snacks into felt ornaments, a Mickey pretzel was a must!

Now, this one looks a little different than the actual pretzels, which you can see below. But believe me when I tell you that it looked SUPER weird when I was trying to make this match. In fact, even Disney themselves changed the look when they released the pretzel items in their Disney Snacks merch line earlier this year.

Take a look at the comparison and tell me that this is still a Mickey Pretzel. Right?

Mickey Pretzel Felt Ornament
Mickey Pretzel Felt Ornament
Mickey Pretzel Felt Ornament

These photos tell a story. It starts with me deciding that I wanted a picture of a Mickey pretzel in front of the Pixar Pal-A-Round, formerly Mickey's Fun Wheel. But there aren't a lot of places that have Mickey prezels at Disney California Adventure. So I took a photo near the Animation Academy (close to where I got my pretzel!). But then I decided that my favorite wall in all of Disneyland was RIGHT there, so this was a good place for a photoshoot. You know...me in my ears...enjoying a pretzel with ears.

We then hike over to get the photo with Mickey in the background and my sister gasps! "You actually took a bite? But what about your photo?!?" And I told her that it was just as authentic this way. And it tasted great too!

Mickey Pretzel Felt Ornament

Now here's the scoop on making this ornament. Each ornament in this series goes together the same way, which is pretty much the same as much other felt applique ornaments. This one is just easier. You can watch my YouTube video showing an ornament from start to finish. (It's a different pattern, but you'll get the idea!).

This design has just one piece for the pretzel itself and then a bunch of french knots for the salt. You've gotta have the salt.

I used wool blend felt from Benzie Design (affiliate link). I cut the circles with my Circles and Scallops die, also from them, but you can use the circle templates in the PDF with plain or decorative scissors if you'd like.

I used freezer paper to cut the pretzel shape and carefully cut out the center sections.

You can embroider the details through the paper before carefully tearing it away, but it's actually easier for this one to remove the freezer paper and freehand the stitching. You can also use seed beads for the salt if you'd prefer!

Next, I stitched the pretzel down to the front circle with a tiny whip stitch and two strands of embroidery floss.

To assemble the ornament I used running stitch around the edges, then I filled in with a second round of running stitch. This is technically holbein stitch and it looks the same on the front and back.

Then I just used embroidery floss to make a little hanger. Other than the salt french knots, this is a fast one to make and perfect for any Disney Snack fan. Of course, now I'm wondering if I should have added a little cup of "plastic cheese"!


project // felt honey bee essential oil diffuser

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Do you love felt ornaments and essential oils? They go really well together because this wool felt bee ornament is also an essential oil diffuser!

I pretty much only use essential oils for the scents and how they fill the air with wonderful smells. So when I thought about how felt is often used with diffusers, I went...wait. What would happen if you put these oils on a wool felt ornament? I did some testing with scraps of Benzie felt and was SO HAPPY with the results that I decided to make a whole thing.

And you can too!

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Today I'm sharing a free pattern, but you could use my other felt ornament patterns as diffusers too.

I will say that while I tested how the oil and felt interact, I haven't tested it long term. I'm not sure at what point it would look gross or if it would get sticky or break down. But the point here is to have a handmade object that you use for a specific purpose. If it doesn't last a really long time, I'm still happy! Hexagons and Scallops Deep-Etch Dies

The ornament base for this uses my new Hexagons and Scallops deep-etch die from Benzie. When I started planning this die, the original idea was for a set of hexagons with some shapes you could use to also make bees and flowers. Because bees...honeycombs...hexagons...

When working with Benzie, we ultimately decided to make the set ONLY hexagons, but I still had these little bee shapes and so I thought it would be fun to share them here! But first I have a few more things to say about these hexagons.

The dies are great for making ornaments, and many of my felt ornament designs will fit on this. I'll also be creating some NEW patterns with the hexagons specifically in mind. The varying sizes allow you to make mini ornaments too, and I'm working on more projects to really put these shapes to use. I have other new dies too, and you can find them exclusively from Benzie Design.

Benzie Deep-Etch Dies (affiliate link)


Now, let's make a bee ornament that's also a diffuser! You will need:

Wool or wool blend felt
Embroidery Floss
Hexagons and Scallops Dies (optional)
Scissors
Freezer paper (optional, but helpful!)
Pencil
Iron
Needle

Bee Diffuser Template PDF

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Using the Hexagons and Scallops die, cut two large plain hexagons and one large scalloped hexagon.

Normally I just use a front and back, but because we're putting oil on this, having an extra layer ensures that none of the oil comes through. I've tested this and it didn't come through with two layers of felt, but this is extra assurance. Plus the layers look cute!

You can use the bee and flower pieces on other ornament shapes if you want. Or just cut out several hexagons by hand!

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Trace the pattern templates onto freezer paper. For the bee, you need one large bee shape and two smaller wing/petal shapes. For a coneflower like I made, you'll need one circle and three smaller wing/petal shapes. You can also make a different flower with more petals if you want.

Iron the freezer paper onto the felt.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Embroider the face and stripes onto the bee before you cut it out. I used french knots for the eyes, a scallop stitch for the mouth, and back stitch for the stripes, all with three strands of black embroidery floss.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Cut out all the pieces and peel off the freezer paper. For the embroidered bee, carefully tear away the paper.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Arrange all of the pieces on the top hexagon. You can use a drop of glue to hold the pieces in place if you'd like.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Using two strands of matching embroidery floss, stitch around the edge of the flower center. Be sure to stitch through the petals as you do this. Use the same process to stitch around the bee body, stitching through the wings at the same time.

You can leave the flower petals and bee wings unstitched so they can stick up from the base. It's cute and 3D this way!

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Layer the three large hexagons like a little sandwich. Make sure the front and back hexagons are in alignment with each other.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Using three strands of embroidery floss, stitch around the hexagon with running stitch. Hide your starting knot between the layers of felt.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

When you reach the start, go back and stitch in the opposite direction, filling in the gaps with the running stitch. When you finish, hide the ending knot between the layers of felt.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

To make a hanger, slide your threaded needle between the layers of felt at the top point of the hexagon.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

Bring the ends of the thread together and tie a knot.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project
Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

To use your ornament as a diffuser, add a few drops of essential oil to the back. The oil will show for a few minutes, but then it will start to soak in and dissapate, leaving the smell behind. I found that the aroma lasted a few days before I needed to add more oil.

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

I went for orange essential oil because it felt like something a bee would like. I don't have too many scents right now, but now that I know I can make these little hanging diffusers, I may need to add to my supply. Especially with so many scents available!

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

To go with my little bee, I also made a honeycomb that doesn't use any extra patterns. It's just all cut using the Hexagons and Scallops die. Of course, I added a little face because things are better with faces! And now I just need some honey essential oil to use with this one!

Felt Bee Essential Oil Project

project // disney snacks mickey waffle felt ornament

Mickey Waffle Felt Ornament

This is not always an easy snack to find at a Disney park, but Mickey waffles are highly regarded. Which is why you should absolutely make a felt ornament version so you always have this favorite treat close by. I will admit that this isn't EXACTLY what a Mickey waffle looks like. But I made it my own style and I think it's so cute this way!

In this series of free patterns, I'm making classic Disney snacks out of felt and turning them into little appliquéd ornaments. This is the second snack, and you can find the first one, popcorn, right here.

These are minimalist patterns, in that there aren't full step-by-step photos, but you'll find an overview below. And if you've ever made any of my other felt ornaments before, you'll already know what to do!

Mickey Waffle Felt Ornament

Before we get to the pattern and process, let's take this ornament on a little vacation...

On my last trip to Disneyland, I didn't find a Mickey waffle, but I did spy some "G'warffle Mix" in the window of the Good Boy! Grocers in Toontown. Surely you could make some Mickey waffles with that mix, right?

Actually, I've heard that Tokyo Disneyland is the best place to get a Mickey waffle. Apparently you have to wait awhile, but you get to see them making the waffles fresh and that they are soooo tasty! But then, I've also seen photos of churro Mickey waffles, and that sounds pretty amazing. Mickey Waffle Felt Ornament

If you haven't made one of my appliqué ornaments before, I recommend watching my YouTube video showing an ornament from start to finish. It's from another pattern, but the process is the same.

Here's how I made the Mickey waffle:

First, this is wool blend felt from Benzie Design (affiliate link). I cut the circles with my Circles and Scallops die, also from them, but you can use the circle templates in the PDF with plain or decorative scissors if you'd like.

I cut the pieces with freezer paper, and I embroidered the details through the paper before carefully tearing it away.

Next, I layered the pieces and stitched them down to the front circle with a tiny whip stitch and two strands of embroidery floss.

To assemble the ornament I used running stitch around the edges, then I filled in with a second round of running stitch. This is technically holbein stitch and it looks the same on the front and back.

Then I just used embroidery floss to make a little hanger. There's a pretty good chance that I'll be filling at least a small Christmas tree with these ornaments this year!


All these needs now is a little bit of syrup!

pattern // tiny quilt blocks cross stitch

Tiny Quilt Blocks Free Cross Stitch Patterns

It's National Quilting Month, and today I'm sharing some free tiny quilt block cross stitch patterns! These are pretty small (most are less than one inch!), so you can stitch them pretty quick. And they are designed more as two groupings: one with the sawtooth star, pinwheel, 8-point star, and antique tile blocks, and the other with the larger grouping of flying geese.

I've made actual quilts, felt quilt blocks, embroidered quilts, embroidery patterns OF quilts, but it was about time that I bring my love of quilts to cross stitch.

Of course, on the 12x12 blocks I added some of my signature smiling faces, but those are done only with back stitch and french knots. You can add them if you like or leave them off if you prefer.

Tiny Quilt Blocks Free Cross Stitch Patterns

Because of the count on these and to make them work out the patterns on a small scale, the individual blocks don't fit easily with the flying geese. There might be a way to make the rows of flying geese into a border for a grouping of the other blocks, but I haven't done that math!

But just like with regular quilting (and cross stitch!), you can move things around, repeat elements, and more. For example, you could choose just one of the small blocks and stitch multiples of them, just changing the color arrangements. This is also a great way to get more comfortable swapping in colors on a cross stitch pattern!

I do think these would be especially cute stitched up as little cross stitched pins (clearly I have a love for small quilty pins!), but they would also just be fun to make teeny tiny designs for your mini gallery wall, or you could line them up and make a bookmark, or...I'm sure you'll find sweet ways to use them. I mean you might even combine them with other patterns all together!

Ready to cross stitch some tiny quilt blocks! I know that I am!



project // felt shamrock ornament with benzie deep-etch dies

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

I always love a good mix-and-match project, and this felt shamrock ornament is SO MUCH THAT! First, it combines felt and printed fabric. Next, it mixes up the idea of ornaments and non-Christmas holidays. And finally, it uses two different deep-etch dies that I designed for Benzie Design, changing up how you use one of them in a big way.

And among all of those things that I think are pretty fun, one of the things that make this project unique from almost every other ornament pattern I've made is that this has a very 3-dimensional quality to it. Plus, St. Patrick's Day is just kinda fun, right?

But first, let's talk about the deep-etch dies.

Felt Treat Trio - Dies
Stamp of Approval Deep-Etch Dies

*This post contains affiliate links.* I've designed several sets of dies that you can use with a manual cutting machine (I have the Sizzix Big Shot). The first set was called Circles and Scallops and its primary use is for cutting out ornament bases, but there's a lot more you can do with them too.

Then I created a set called Stamp of Approval, which has stamp base pieces, but also hearts and an X and O. Now, you could make a shamrock stamp with just this set, but I went for a circular ornament and the second to largest heart.

I didn't think I needed a die-cutter like this. But I LOVE using it. And I love finding new ways to use the dies that I have.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

So if you are still processing all this, the shamrock on this ornament is made with hearts. The stem part is just cut freehand. And while this tutorial doesn't have patterns (I'm using the dies, afterall), you could cut circles for the ornament base and then cut out some hearts if you don't have these dies.

I'll also show you how to easily make this a 4-leaf clover, which would make this a lucky charm and not just an ornament.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

I maintain that hearts are NOT just for Valentine's Day, and using them to make something else entirely only adds to my point.

So let's grab some supplies and make a shamrock ornament!

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

You will need:

Wool blend felt in two colors
Circles and Scallops deep-etch die
Manual die cutting machine
Green printed fabric
Paper-backed fusible web (I used Wonder Under)
Iron
Stamp of Approval deep-etch die
Scissors
Green embroidery floss
Needle
Stuffing

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Cut out a front and back circle for your ornament.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Iron the fusible web to the back of the fabric, then peel off the paper and iron it to a piece of felt.

This is a piece that's the right size for one heart, but you can prepare a larger piece to cut all your hearts. You'll just run them through the cutting machine one at a time.

You'll need a total of three hearts for a shamrock or four hearts for a 4-leaf clover. Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Place the die on the fabric side of the fused felt. Cut it out with the die cutter. You may notice a little embossed line around the edge, but that will go away if you iron it.

You can place the die on the felt side instead of the fabric side, but I found it had a cleaner cut placing the die on the fabric.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Cut a small stem from one of the fused scrap pieces. It can be as simple as a rectangle if you want!

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Fold the hearts in half with the fabric sides touching. Iron them to crease the center.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Arrange the pieces on the scalloped circle. This is how a 4-leaf clover would look, but I went for a shamrock, so the hearts needed to spread out a little.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Use three strands of embroidery floss and running stitch to sew down the middle of each of the shamrock pieces.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial Place the front and back of the ornament together an sew around the edges with running stitch through the stitch markings. Leave an opening and add a bit of stuffing inside.

Finish sewing the opening closed.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Add a simple hanging loop on the back of the ornament.

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

Share your finished ornament with your favorite Irish friend or make a bunch to decorate an all-seasons tree!

Of course, you can also hang one of these in your car as a good luck charm. Maybe even fill it with lavender so it doubles as an air-freshener!

Felt Shamrock Ornament Tutorial

One of the reasons I made mine as a shamrock, verses the 4-leaf clover has to do with St. Patrick himself. Well, sort of. Legend says that St. Patrick would use a 3-leaf clover or shamrock to explain the concept of the Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Like the leaves, they are all separate but also one and the same.

That may not have been something St. Patrick really did, but I still love that this Irish symbol can be a reminder of the Trinity even today!

project // felt quilt block pins

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Show your love of quilting with these sweet felt quilt block pins! March is National Quilt Month, so I thought it would be fun to use my Cozy Quilt Block felt ornament pattern to make something a little different. Instead of making quilt ornaments, today we're making pins. AND, you'll see how you can make some extra quilt block designs!

Last fall I released the ornament pattern in my shop and it shows how to make 12 quilt blocks using the templates included. Here's what those look like:

Cozy Quilt Block Felt Ornaments

Each of the quilt blocks measure about 1.75 inches (the non-square ones are different)...the perfect size for super cute pins!

I mean, just look at this 8-point quilt star in a rainbow of felt colors. I didn't make it a full quilt block, but it still has quilt vibes.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

But now look at how I made blocks that aren't in my original pattern, but still use those pieces. This first one is a Courthouse Steps block, but made using the Log Cabin ornament templates.

Felt Quilt Block Pins
Felt Quilt Block Pins

The orange and pink block is a quilt pattern called Solitaire, and it's made using the largest and smallest triangles from the 4x4 grid. (In the Cozy Quilt Block pattern, I talk about the different grids and how the pieces fit this way.)

I chose these blocks because I thought they were fun to play with and make. But also because you can see how it's not too hard to find designs that you can make using the very same pieces. And you can, of course, create different ornament designs too.

To make this project extra quick, I even skipped stitching (other than the faces). So are you ready to make some easy felt quilt block pins?

Here's what you need:

Cozy Quilt Block felt ornament pattern (available in my Etsy shop)
Felt scraps (Wool or wool blend felt is best - I use Benzie Felt *affiliate link*)
White felt - two 2-inch squares for each pin
Freezer paper
Pencil
Scissors
Craft glue
Black embroidery floss
Needle
Pin back

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Because I save my felt scraps, I used those for my quilt pieces as much as possible. I also planned out which pieces I would need for the different blocks I was making.

Trace or print the patterns onto freezer paper because I promise you it makes cutting the tiny shapes so much better. These pieces need to fit together with some precision, so it matters. At the end of the ornament pattern, there are pages that are designed for easy printing, and if you've never printed on freezer paper before, I have a video that talks about it.

Iron the freezer paper onto the felt.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Cut out the felt pieces, then peel off the freezer paper. Follow the same process for any block you're making.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

This is the Courthouse Steps block that I made using the Log Cabin templates. I used the center square, two of the smallest rectangles, four of the rectangles from the top of the Log Cabin, and two of the largest rectangles.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

The 8-point star is just eight colors of felt all cut using the 8-point star templates, but skipping the the extra squares and triangles to fill in the spaces around the points.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

For a Solitaire block, the four corners are the largest triangle in the 4x4 grid section of the Cozy Quilt Block pattern templates. All the rest of the pieces are the smallest triangles. I cut four of them from the same light orange color for the center. The bands of coral include six small triangles each of two similar felt colors, which I alternated.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Cut two 2-inch squares from white felt. I used a rotary cutter and ruler for this, but as long as they are square, you can do this any way you like!

Start gluing the quilt pieces to one of the squares. There will be a small edge of white felt showing, so it helps to use that as a guide for centering an edge piece or two on your quilt block.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Be sure to spread the glue evenly over the back of each piece.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

On this one, I glued down the corners to make sure the edges were even, then I spread glue in the center and fit the pieces in like a puzzle!

Felt Quilt Block Pins

After the glue dries you can add faces if you'd like. Because the glue stiffens the felt, you'll need a good sharp needle for this. I made my faces with the basic French knot eyes and a scallop smile, but you can use the other faces styles in the pattern too.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Grab the second felt square and evenly spread glue on one side. Place the quilt block square on top and press it to flatten the squares.

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Glue a pin back to the back of your quilt block. Stitching this onto the second felt square before you glue the layers is a more secure way to do this, but remember my goal of making this easy!

Felt Quilt Block Pins

Once the glue is all dry you can wear your new pin or share them with friends! How fun would these be to make at a craft gathering or even to trade them with all your quilting pals?

Felt Quilt Block Pins
Felt Quilt Block Pins
Felt Quilt Block Pins

Coats made out of quilts are pretty popular right now, but I think this is a pretty adorable way to wear your favorite quilt!

Felt Quilt Block Pins