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project // making fabric (hexagon!) stamps like nanaCompany

Hexagon Stamps


Did you know that in some countries you can buy stamps...postage stamps...that are hexagons? I can't even tell you how jealous that makes me. I don't use stamps that often, but I feel like I'd mail more things with stamps if they were in my favorite shape.

And yes, I'm a thirty-cough-cough year old who has a favorite shape.

But back to stamps. Amy Sinibaldi of nanaCompany often has little stamps, postmarks, and other mail-related things in her work, and her fabric stamps are simply adorable. I credit her for this project, and she credits another. This is how ideas travel. Via air mail.

My adaptation is to make them into the foreign hexagon stamps that I covet. I even added some embroidery!

Hexagon Stamps

First, trace a hexagon onto paper-backed fusible interfacing.

Hexagon Stamps

Iron the hexagon(s) to the back of the fabric. If you are using print fabrics, this is the perfect opportunity to fussy cut and get the part you like the most.

Hexagon Stamps

If you plan to embroider a stamp, make sure that you place the hexagon in from the edges a bit so you can hoop the fabric. Transfer the pattern, then remove the paper backing.

A thing to consider here...I don't know what would happen if you used a pattern transfer method that would require soaking. I used a fine-tip transfer pen this time. I'll give the soaking method a go soon.

Hexagon Stamps

Embroider the fabric, centering the design on the interfacing that's on the back. Also, avoid knots, as they'll give your stamp some lumpiness. Use the method described here to start and stop without knots.

Hexagon Stamps


Cut out the hexagon, and iron it onto some creamy white fabric. Add interfacing to the back of the white, then cut it out with pinking shears for a nice stamp edge.

Hexagon Stamps

How about these fussy cut racing cats? I do believe that they are worthy of their own project. Maybe I'll try making some stamped coasters...all with kitties? Thanks to Fabric Supply, I officially have a kitty fabric collection.

Hexagon Stamps
Hexagon Stamps

The tiny ones are equally cute, although harder to cut with the pinking shears. The corners don't always come out pretty, so I trimmed one down with straight edges. Still fun!

Hexagon Stamps

I may have just become a fabric philatelist.


A little envelope was too perfect for today's stamps, right? This way you can stitch some happy mail...literally!

8 comments:

  1. Adorable! I have lots of cute, but tiny scraps that would be perfect for this.

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  2. Anonymous11:26 AM

    Super cute idea! I'll have to try this.

    This is unrelated, but what are your experiences with metallic threads? I'm planning a project that I definitely need metallic threads for (a carousel horse!) and am quite at a loss of what to use. I need something that I don't have to order online. What metallic threads have you used {and liked}? Where can I get them? Which ones should I avoid using? Thanks in advance!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The easiest metallic thread to find is DMC, but it can be difficult to work with. If you follow their instructions for how to thread it, length, etc., it is do-able.

      Kreinik thread is supposedly easier, but I don't have enough experience to say. Jenny of Sublime Stitching highly recommends their thread. You may be able to find it locally, but again, I'm not sure.

      My biggest tip for working with any metallic thread is to use shorter lengths so it has less chance to tangle.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous6:01 PM

      Thanks, Mollie!

      Delete
  3. Oh my you DO have the hex fever don't you? Not me no, no. Although I decided I need a hexagon mug rug (s) to go with every themed tea cup set I have LOL. That will keep me busy!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous7:05 AM

    Mollie,

    What about stitching rick-rack to the back of some of these? Then the stamp could be appliqued to another piece of fabric of clothing. Smiley face and all!

    Maureen

    ReplyDelete

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