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embroidery basics: fill stitches • part 2


Last time around, we talked about some different fill stitches, but there are still more. In fact, today you’ll see the more common fills. We’ll continue using the raindrops from the previous lesson, so if you started that, you’re already set to go!

The first stitch today is called a long and short stitch. Personally, I think the title is deceiving. Only at the edges are you using long and short, the rest of the time you are creating all long stitches.
Long and Short Stitch
Think of this stitch as laying bricks (I’ve even seen this referred to as a brick stitch...which makes a lot more sense!). The stitches are all the same length, but they overlap each other.
Long and Short Stitch
You can work them in rows going across, which is especially nice if you want to blend colors (use similar shades for this), or you can stitch them end to end, like I’ve done here. This is basically a backstitch.
Long and Short Stitch
Oh, and you don’t NEED to have an outline around the whole thing. In fact, in the next stitch, you aren’t supposed to have that one! (I just happen to like the outline look.)

This next one is a satin stitch, and is one of the most popular fills for small-ish areas, and it’s easy to see why. It’s smooth and beautiful!
Satin Stitch
To satin stitch, come up on one side of the area, and go down on the other side.
Satin Stitch
Come back up on the first side, just next to your first stitch, and back down on the other side, just next to your first stitch. It’s like you’re wrapping the area on the front and back.
Satin Stitch back
Satin Stitch
Repeat this over and over until the area is filled in. The trick is to keep the edges smooth, and the area solid. The weave of some fabrics can make this difficult sometimes, but with practice, you’ll get a nice smooth fill.
Satin Stitch
As I mentioned, traditionally, a satin stitch doesn’t have an outline around it. But why be traditional? I like an outline for two reasons:

1. It looks cute.
2. It hides a multitude of stitching sins. Now no one needs to know that my edges aren’t perfect!

Stitched with pearl cotton, like I’m doing here, a regular satin stitch already has some dimension, but for even more, especially with regular floss, you can add some padding.
Puffed Satin Stitch base
An outline and/or some rice stitches in the middle of the area will help with this, so start with that.
Puffed Satin Stitch
Now you can do a regular satin stitch over those stitches. You just come up and back down right on the outside of the outline.
Puffed Satin Stitch
Nice and puffy!
Modified Satin Stitch
The last fill stitch is a modified satin stitch. Come up on one side of the area, and go down on the other side. Now, here’s the big difference...
Modified Satin Stitch
Come up on the same side as you went down, and then down on the other side of the area.
Modified Satin Stitch
You’re working back and forth more, and the back of your work will be open, not wrapped. The result is more open and casual on the front as well. I like it!

Fill Stitches
Hey! That’s all of the basic fills! And if you're like me, you still have a few raindrops to go. Come up with some ideas of your own, or practice the stitches that gave you the most trouble. Now, get practicing and you’ll never want empty areas again!




This is the end of the stitch posts that I have planned for the Embroidery Basics series, but if you have any questions about this, or other embroidery techniques, I'd be happy to answer them to the best of my abilities. Leave a comment, and I'll answer all questions in one more Embroidery Basics post in 2 weeks.

15 comments:

  1. i was always curious about the satin stitching. thanks for this awesome tutorial! <3

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  2. Love your tutorials!!! Thanks so much! xxx

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  3. Oh my goodness - how do I not know about padding?? what the...lol. Thanks, lovely!

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  4. yay! I'm so glad you're doing this! Thanks!

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  5. Just a quick note to let you know that a link to this post will be placed on CraftCrave today [20 May 02:15am GMT]. Thanks, Maria

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  6. The long and short stitch I know does have long and short stitches - used in shading to blend colours together.
    I had forgotten about brick stitch, so thanks for reminding me!
    Gem
    x

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  7. Thank you so much for this post. I want to let you know that I posted a link to your blog in CBH Digital Scrapbooking Freebies, under the Page 8 post on May. 20, 2011. Thanks again.

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  8. Thanks so much Mollie! This was seriously SO helpful. I've got something special planned for next weeks tea party. If I can pull it off in time, it'll make you proud! I'm using so many of your techniques!

    xoxo
    Janee
    yellowbirdyellowbeard.blogspot.com

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  9. These have been so so useful. Thank you again! I have only one question... will you be doing a continuation from these?? =P (PS can't wait for the virtual tea party! I'm ALL ready with a post for it!) =) x

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  10. Hey there!

    I just randomly decided I wanted to learn embroidery and after reading through your basic embroidery series I am so excited to go! I just wanted to say thanks for such an awesome breakdown of what I need to know! I feel like I've learned so much!

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  11. Anonymous10:51 AM

    That isn't long and short stitch, which is always worked in horizontal rows, never vertical. What you are doing is rows of back stitch. Brick stitch is similar to long and short stitch but they are not the same, although people often call them by both names. It has become confusing because people get muddled up.

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  12. i'm just now getting into embroidery and i found this so helpful! :)

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  13. hi mollie..im maryam..i lyk ur way of demonstration....its simple n cute..can u plz tell me how to do satin stitch in a big flower rose or sunflwer etc so that the thread dont go wasted...from upwards it comes like fully filled but from the back side of the fabric, it doesnt looks heavy n filled...i think u got my point...do reply me..

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    1. Carina shows what I think you're looking for on her Lazy Satin Stitch post. The last teardrop shape that I showed above uses a similar technique.

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  14. I just read through all your embroidery basics, and they are phenomenal! I can't thank you enough for your detailed help in starting my new hobby. You're wonderful. :)

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