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project // wire rack weaving

Wire Rack Weaving


When I was young, and even when I got older, I would spend a lot of time baking with my grandma. I called her Nanny. She passed away a few years ago, and I acquired a few of her baking pans. I treasure them, and when I used one recently to make one of her recipes for the first time, I actually got really emotional. We get quite close to people, don't we?

Anyway, I've had this cooling rack sitting here in my piles of craft supplies. Honestly, I'm not sure if it was Nanny's or another family member's, but she did have several just like this, so I choose to remember it as hers. There are a few of the cross pieces broken off, which is why it ended up looking for another use, other than cooling baked goods. I've considered lots of ways to use it, but when weaving started coming around again, I knew it was time to get making.

Wire Rack Weaving

There's nothing difficult about making an art piece like this. Just be aware that unlike traditional weaving, you won't be removing the frame. Once it's woven, it's all staying as one piece. Which is really the point here. I want to have this wire rack hanging on my wall. And even if you don't have a cooling rack with sentimental value (I may be the only person in the world who does!), it's still a fun way to add some vintage into your new creation.

Wire Rack Weaving

Here's what you need:

Vintage cooling rack
Yarn
Cardboard
Scissors

Wire Rack Weaving

Cut some strips of cardboard. I made three, and each is a different width/length. The largest is good for as you're getting started and you have more space to work. As you fill in the rack, you'll need the narrower strips.

Wrap some yarn around a cardboard strip, and what? It magically turns into a shuttle!

Wire Rack Weaving

Tie a knot onto one of the cross pieces, leaving a long tail. Actually, you can do this without the knots, you just need to hold the end in place as you get started. I found the knot to be a little easier. Weave the tail in, and make sure the very end is to the back of your work.

Wire Rack Weaving

Start weaving the yarn through the wires. It helps to hold the rack flat, then keep the shuttle vertical as you work up and down through the gaps. After you've covered 1/3 to 1/2 of the width of the rack, pull the yarn taut.

Wire Rack Weaving

When you reach the end, wrap it around and go back to the other side.

Wire Rack Weaving

Switch out the yarn and keep going. Using different colors, weights, and textures is what makes it visually interesting. You might also try skipping over two wires instead of one to make a different pattern, or leaving some sections looser or even blank.

When you get close to the edge, you'll need one of the thinner cardboard shuttles. It also helps to scrunch your weaving tight, then when you can't fit the shuttle in any more, finish off your yarn and loosen up the weaving to fill in the area a bit.

Wire Rack Weaving
Wire Rack Weaving

To hang mine, I used a piece of yarn tied at the center support.

Wire Rack Weaving
Wire Rack Weaving
Wire Rack Weaving

It's probably silly, but this makes me ridiculously happy. An added bonus is that some of this yarn was also Nanny's. Getting to making something with a few of her things means a lot. Long after weaving has gone off trend again, I'll be admiring this and thinking of her.

Wire Rack Weaving

12 comments:

  1. I just love this! I can see my granddaughter making this ~

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    1. You should make one together!

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  2. I adore this idea, it looks beautiful! x

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  3. Sweet and such a nice way to remember your Nanny.

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  4. I love this idea! Like Mary Ellen, I can see doing this with my grandchildren. It's a perfect set up for a portable weaving loom in a small space! I pinned it and will be setting it up as soon as their mama returns to work! Thank you!

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  5. This made me cry, Mollie, as I have been thinking so much about my Grandma lately and how I wish she was still here with us! There would be so much to learn from her! I want to try this...right after I ever finish the 50 States Quilt, which I haven't even started yet! LOL. Hey, the weaving may need to come first!!! Thanks for this great idea!
    xoxo- Julie

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  6. That is a really neat idea. Great art piece but I wonder what other uses it could have? Hanging drop earrings? If it was woven quite densely, maybe as a tackboard? I'll have to keep an eye out at thrift stores for a wire cooling rack! :)

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    Replies
    1. Great ideas! I also thought maybe a trivet, though you wouldn't want food to get on it.

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  7. So pretty!!! Love it and the sentiment

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  8. LOVE this idea! Will definitely have to try this out. :)

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  9. This is a work of genius!

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