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project: hand-worked eyelet towel loops

Eyelet Towel


Yesterday I shared a new book with you and promised a project to accompany my newly learned skill of hand-working eyelets. It makes me feel so very accomplished, and I know you'll feel the same as I do. As in, you'll want to find places to stitch these little guys...and I've got your first project!

I've found kitchen towels at IKEA or other stores that have a little loop at one corner to make it easier to hang the towel, keeping it handy in the kitchen. But why not add a bit of color and make your own hanging "loop"?

Eyelet Towel

You will need:
a kitchen towel
pearl cotton
a water-soluble pen (optional)

Eyelet Towel

Draw a circle on one corner of the towel. Make it a tiny bit larger than you want the eyelet to be.

Eyelet Towel

Cut a length of pearl cotton (about 2 feet). Tie a knot in one end and thread the other through a large needle. Stitch around the circle with running stitch.

Eyelet Towel

Here's the scary part. Cut out the center of the circle. Leave a small margin of fabric so you don't cut the stitches. Now, if this all worries you, consider doing a test eyelet on scrap fabric first.

Eyelet Towel
Eyelet Towel

Start stitching around the opening to bind it. You can use an overcast stitch like you see I've done, or a blanket stitch, which is going by the book.

Eyelet Towel

Continue all around the circle, so that it looks like satin stitch. Try to keep your stitches all the same length, although, this takes practice. Which I, obviously, am still working on. If it helps, you can draw an outer circle to follow. When you've reached the end, secure it with a knot hidden on the back.

Eyelet Towel

Now it's ready to hang! I stitched this one in navy because it matches our kitchen counter, but I think the next one I do will be red. Pearl cotton comes in lots of colors, so imagine the possibilities for customizing your towels! You could even make a whole set as a very nice little shower gift!

10 comments:

  1. Very nice! I like how you do tutorials for basics like this. :)

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  2. I love how beautifully practical this is and shared on my Seasons of Joy Facebook page:
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seasons-of-Joy

    Thanks for such a detailed tutorial!

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  3. Ooh thanks for this tutorial! Maybe I can do some red & green ones for Christmas gifts! :)

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  4. I have so much to learn... thanks for teach us

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    Replies
    1. I'm so happy to be learning alongside of all of you!

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  5. this is great and practical and needs no sewing machine for buttonholes, even better

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  6. Anonymous6:33 AM

    A paper hole punch would be an easy way to make the hole

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For some fabrics that would work great, at least to get it started. Although, often they will shread the edges. A Crop-a-Dile does a pretty good job if you don't need the hole to be very large.

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  7. Thanks for this wonderfull tutorial, verywell explained!

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  8. ooooh! i just got some new tea towels and was thinking how much the needed an eyelet!

    ReplyDelete

I often reply to comments in the comments...check back if you have a question!